Person Sheet


Name Barbara Kessler34
Birth 1802, Seewis im Pritigau, Graubünden, Switzerland35
Death 12 Aug 1870, Troy, Sauk, Wisconsin35
Burial Aug 1870, Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy, Sauk, Wisconsin35
Immigration 26 May 1846, New Orleans, Louisiana
Religion Reformiert
Alias/AKA Adolphine
Father Johan Keßler (-<1838)
Mother Catarina Jann (-<1838)
Spouses:
1 Nicholas Tarnutzer34, 2C4R
Birth 15 Nov 1805, Schiers, Graubünden, Switzerland35,36
Immigration 26 May 1846, New Orleans, Louisiana
Burial Jun 1870, Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy, Sauk, Wisconsin35
Death 15 Jun 1870, Troy, Sauk, Wisconsin35
Occupation Farmer
Religion Reformiert
Father Andreas Tarnutzer (~1779-1836)
Mother Anna Ruosch (1778-1824)
Marriage 20 Jan 1833, Schuders, Graubünden, Switzerland
Children: Anna (1833-1834)
Andrew (1834-1898)
Johann Peter (1838-<1880)
Notes for Barbara Kessler
Her name is given as Barbara Cassal on the marriage record but appears to be Barbla Kessler on the record of her son Andreas' birth. The Kessler surname is also given in the 1835 census record.

The 1870 U.S. Census has her named "Adolphine," age 68 for some reason. Since she died after him and there is no other evidence for an Adolphine in the vicinity, let alone married to him, we will take this as an error. She is buried beside Nicholas.
Research
38 (v. 25, no. 170), 40
1835 Swiss census, Schiers, Graubünden, v. CB IV 15, p. 298 (no. 937) [LDS FHL microfilm 1475935#3]
1838 Swiss census, Schuders, Graubünden, v. CB IV 24, p. 202, no. 44 [LDS FHL microfilm 1475937]
1850 Swiss census, Schuders, Graubünden, v. CB IV 35, p. 337 (no. 3) [LDS FHL microfilm 1475950]
1850 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, r. 1006, p. 92
1860 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, r. 1429, p. 858
1870 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin
Notes for Nicholas (Spouse 1)
He was born in the Montagna district. The godparents and witnesses at his christening were Class Troug, Andreas Mayer, Madalena Hartmann, and Elsa Darmin.

They arrived in New Orleans from Havre, France, on board the ship "Pactotus," Capt. John Harding, master. About half of the 197 passengers on board the ship were Swiss. Listed just before Nicholas' family were Rudolf Jecklin, age 30, and Margreth Jecklin, age 26.

There are a number of Tarnutzers applying for citizenship in Sauk County, Wisconsin, in the 1800s. The first one listed is Nicholas Tarnutzer, who made his intention on 5 April 1847. This intention shows that Nicholas was from Graubünden, Switzerland, he was aged about 44 years, and that he left Havre, France, on 9 April 1846, and arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana, in May 1846.

He was listed as being a citizen of Schuders, living elsewhere, at the time of the 1850 Swiss census.

Nicholas Tarnutzer, who died in 1870, aged 71, and is buried in the Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy Township, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, is almost certainly the same person. Check the land and church records for further information.

Nicholas had real estate worth $500 in 1850 and in 1860 it was worth $5000 and his personal estate was $1000. The 1870 census showed nothing for real estate and $150 for personal estate.

Also buried in the same Cemetery are: Nicklaus Tarnutzer, d. March 1869, 19y [county records say March 1870], and Leonhard Tarnutzer, d. March 1870, 25y. These seem to be too young to be children of Nicholas and Barbara, as she would have been 48 and 43 years old at the time of the births and 48 definitely seems too old. Possibly they were grandchildren or nephews of Nicholas. [check census records].

Others included Pierre/Peter Tarnutzer on 7 January 1869; Andrew Tarnutzer, who received citizenship on 31 August 1860; another Andrew Tarnutzer, 5 November 1888.12

Nicholas and Barbary [sic] are seen in Honey Creek Township, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, in the 1850 census, along with sons Andrew, age 18, and John, age 12. They are in the Troy township in the 1860 census, apparently they had not moved, but the Troy township was created out of Honey Creek. According to the History of Sauk County, he [given as Nick Darnutzer, sic] and J. A. Sprecher, moved to the northern part of Troy Township early in the spring of 1846. They were the first white settlers in that area. They came through Prairie du Sac and had to build a bridge across Honey Creek to reach the area they were to settle.37

The History also lists another "F. Darnutzer," as a settler in the area before 1850. A. Tarnutzer was the Chairman of the Troy Township board in 1866, 1867, and 1868.

This Nicholas Tarnutzer is not the father of the Christina who married Valentine Schalaben and Johannes Johanni. I have not yet found the birth record of this Nicholas, despite having searched 1795-1807.

I am using his age from the 1835 Swiss census, which puts his birthdate in 1806 and fixes his wife's surname.

Erhart Mueller provides some additonal information on him in the biography of his son Rev. Andrew. The farm they started was owned by Clarence Sprecher in 1970.
Research
12 (Index, p. 204; v. 0, p. 26, No. 78), 38 (v. 25, no. 170), 39, 40
1835 Swiss census, Schiers, Graubünden, v. CB IV 15, p. 298 (no. 936) [LDS FHL microfilm 1475935#3]
1838 Swiss census, Schuders, Graubünden, v. CB IV 24, p. 202, no. 43 [LDS FHL microfilm 1475937]
1850 Swiss census, Schuders, Graubünden, v. CB IV 35, p. 337 (no. 2) [LDS FHL microfilm 1475950]
1850 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, r. 1006, p. 92
1860 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, r. 1429, p. 858
1870 U.S. census, Sauk Co., Wisconsin, r. 1739, p. 262B
Last Modified 3 Dec 2000 Created 24 Mar 2002 by EasyTree for Windows

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